my favorite snacks : roasted red pepper hummus

Posted on Mar 10, 2011 in Food

Hummus is remarkable. It is packed full of protein, flavor and fiber. It is endlessly customizable and can be paired with almost any food. Dip in some crackers, pretzels or veggies. Slather it on a sandwich. Use it as salad dressing.

Hummus has a permanent spot in our refrigerator.

I have two tips for making homemade hummus.

First, organic, dry chickpeas from the bulk bins at your local grocery store are the way to go! I get mine for about $1.25/pound. A can of organic chickpeas costs $1.25, too. One pound of chickpeas will get you 3-4 cans worth of chickpeas!

Of course, dried chickpeas take a little more effort. We soak them the night before, cook the next day and then freeze in 1 cup increments.

My second tip will sound totally crazy. For truly smooth, creamy and fluffy hummus, you need to peel your chickpeas.

If I’m being totally honest, I don’t do this all the time, but to get the texture of the store-bought varieties, the beans need to be peeled. Peeling is easy, but time-consuming. Most of the skins will crack during cooking, so just simply squeeze each chickpea between your thumb and forefinger and the skin pops off.

My favorite hummus recipe is flavored with roasted red peppers. The flavor is rockin’ and the color is absolutely beautiful.

In the winter, I use jarred roasted red peppers. But in the summer, roasting your own red peppers fresh from the vine is the way to go!

Roasted Red Pepper Hummus

2 cups cooked chickpeas, peeled
1/3 c. tahini
1 handful fresh parsley
1-12 oz. jar roasted red peppers, drained (or 2-3 fresh peppers, roasted, peeled and deseeded)
1 tbsp. cumin
3 tbsp. lemon juice
3-4 tsp. minced garlic, jarred (1-3 cloves, if fresh)
Salt and pepper, to taste
1/4-1/2 c. olive oil

Combine all ingredients, minus olive oil, into a food processor. Pulse until all incorporated. Turn food processor on medium-high and stream in olive oil. Let process for 5-7 minutes, or until fluffy and smooth.

Makes 12-1/4 cup servings.

 

12 Comments

  1. PERFECT TIMING! I work for a food distributor, Sabra is one of the products we distribute. We were given a bunch of it that expired and couldn’t be sold at stores, it was great but I am so excited to try it homemade. Thanks for posting. Will be making it this weeked :) Will let ya know how it turns out here. Have a great night!

    • Yum! I hope you like it. And I recommend peeling the chickpeas in front of the TV or something. It can get tedious.

  2. I love hummus and have never been very successful at making it homemade. It’s good, but never as good as Trader Joes.
    I might have to try this.
    One of my favorite breakfasts is toast slathered with hummus and then put on sliced cucumber and tomatoes with a leaf of lettuce. Yummmmyyy!

    • Mmmmm, that sounds delicious!

  3. My husband and I gave up meat for lent so we are on the hunt for great whole foods that give us plenty of protein. This looks sooo good!

    • It is SO good! Let me know if you try it. :)

  4. Yum! I was just thinking of making hummus yesterday but got busy and didn’t get around to it.I might just make some later today.I also had been thinking of getting the dried chickpeas instead of the canned, just wasn’t sure how to go about it.Thanks. :)

  5. I have a question: If you don’t have a food processer with a little spout on it is there a way to blend in the olive oil? I have a small cheap hamilton beach food processer and theres no spout thingie to add the oil while its blending… any suggestions? Thanks!

    • I would just add a little bit at a time, blending well after each addition, until it was the right consistency. Maybe a tablespoon at a time?

  6. Here from Tastespotting…

    I get the peels off by massaging the cooked chickpeas in a bath of deep water (in my largest stock pot). The peels float to the surface and you can dredge them off. This is actually a fantastic job for a little one in the kitchen! :)

    If you use Extra Virgin Olive Oil, it’s best to do the majority of your whizzing-up before you start adding it. The heat friction caused by the blades of the food processor can actually make the oil turn bitter. I actually use water to get the consistency I want, and stir olive oil in after I’m done processing. Lower fat content, no risk of bitter hummus.

    p.s. I have a love story similar to yours! 8 years later, we’re still perfect for each other. When you know, you know. ;)

  7. I too remove all the skins. I’ve found a good percentage come off if I rub the peas after soaking them. And when I haven’t any tahini I just add a dash or two of sesame oil. Love your idea of using roasted peppers!

    • You mean before you cook them they’ll rub off? I’ll have to try it next time!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>