roasted garlic mashed potatoes

Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes

I think mashed potatoes are the sad, forgotten dish of the Thanksgiving table. They are usually somewhere in the spread, but very few people sing the potato praises when the meal is finished.

That’s sad. Potatoes be good, yo. Especially when you amp up the flavor with buttery, mild and nutty roasted garlic. No need for gravy with these taters, the flavor and texture is spot on without any additions.

If you’ve never roasted a head of garlic before, it might be one of those kitchen tasks that seem scary, but I promise it’s as easy as can be. When shopping for the heads of garlic you are going to roast, look for flat bottoms so they lay flat in the pan. Remember, roasted garlic is much, much milder than raw garlic. For a fun treat, spread a clove or two of roasted garlic on a piece of buttered toast. So good!

Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes

Inspired by The Pioneer Woman

I’m a pretty lazy cook and rarely peel my potatoes before mashing them. The peels add a ton of fiber and nutrients. But if you like the smooth and creamy texture of peel-less mashed potatoes, go ahead and peel.

Serves 6-8

Print this recipe

Ingredients:

  • 3 heads of garlic
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 pounds potatoes, washed and cut into chunks
  • 1/2 stick butter
  • 4 ounces cream cheese
  • 1/4 cup half and half cream
  • Salt and pepper

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375°.
  2. Using a sharp knife, cut off the top of the heads of garlic. Discard tops.
  3. Place heads of garlic in a pie pan, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cover pie pan with aluminum foil and bake in oven for 25-30 minutes or until garlic is soft and creamy. Remove from oven and let cool.
  4. In a large pot of water, boil potato chunks until soft and tender.
  5. Drain potatoes and add back into pot. Mash until steam is released.
  6. Add in butter, cream cheese, and half and half. Mash until smooth and well incorporated.
  7. Squeeze in the roasted cloves of garlic from the heads (yes, all three). Mash until well incorporated.
  8. Salt and pepper the potatoes to taste.

Do you like your mashed potatoes with brown gravy, white gravy or gravy-free?

 

21 Comments

  1. says

    I prefer gravy-free but I’ll take brown gravy if someone is being gravy-happy while serving. White gravy is for biscuits!

    Mashed potatoes are so good. They were my big pregnancy craving. And these look awesome! Nom nom nom.

      • Cassie says

        Yeah, Babyface had never heard of it before either. I should totally make some! It used to be my favorite dish the elementary school cafeteria would serve. :)

  2. says

    This looks amazing! And you’re right; I totally skipped over the potatoes in my thanksgiving post. Yours sound so good. Cream cheese?!?! Who’d have thought?

    I wonder what these would be like if you roasted the potatoes as well?

    I used to date a guy who would make a volcano from his mashed potatoes and gravy. Every damn time. It was hilarious and somewhat embarrassing. I like mine with a little mushroom gravy, if it’s around.

  3. says

    I never peel my potatoes, either. My mom always made them that way so for the longest time I didn’t realize there was any other way. Now I think it’s weird when people scoff at peels in their mashed potatoes. Your recipe looks fantastic!

  4. Natalie says

    Your Thanksgiving feast looks amazing, Cassie! I’m definitely going to have to try roasting my own garlic. How much of the roasted garlic do you put into the potatoes? I didn’t catch that part in the recipe. :)

    • Cassie says

      Whoops! I forgot to write that in there didn’t I? Fixed in the recipe.

      I add the whole three heads. Seems like a lot, but roasted garlic is so mild that it takes a lot. :)

    • Cassie says

      Hahah! They should invent taste-o-vision or something.

      Or not. Can you imagine walking into a library or Starbucks and seeing everyone licking their computer? Ha!

  5. says

    My hus uses a similar recipe for our mashed potatoes, only we use sour cream instead of the cream cheese, and temper in an egg or two. We have a huge family, and make about 15 pounds of them at Thanksgiving. So.Good.

      • says

        The eggs add a layer of depth and richness to the potatoes that I never even imagined. It was one of those things his grandmother used to do, I think. There’s just more.. body to them. I’m not sure I can even really describe it, but you notice it when the egg is there! (And then, they have that little extra binder in there for when you use the leftovers to make potato pancakes!)

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