whole grain ciabatta bread

Posted on Aug 12, 2013 in Food

ciabatta

I’ve mentioned it here before, but I’m really not a very confident bread baker. Baking is such a science, and I’m much more of a dash-of-this, dash-of-that kinda girl. That doesn’t work so well when you’re trying to recreate precise chemical reactions.

The irony of this is that we actually do a lot of bread baking in this house. We stopped buying bread years ago and make almost everything “in-house”. Craig is the master of sandwich bread (someday I’ll get him to post that recipe), and I tackle our other loaves. And while I still don’t feel 100% confident in my yeast-wielding skills, I do feel pretty comfortable with a few of my go-tos—namely pizza crust, focaccia, and this whole grain ciabatta.

ciabatta

I know, it sounds silly. I mean, really, ciabatta bread isn’t supposed to be whole grain. Ciabatta is meant to be crusty and fluffy and the whitest of white breads. And while I’m not afraid to dig into a great loaf of crusty white bread on occasion, I prefer to add whole grains wherever I can. And the great thing about this whole grain loaf is that it stays crusty and fluffy, just like its white flour cousin.

ciabatta

I love tearing off a hunk of this bread to eat with soup. It also makes an awesome sandwich bread if you slice it lengthwise. A grilled cheese made with this bread, extra sharp cheddar and lots of butter? Yum. And this bread really holds up well to sauces making it a great option for pizza bread or bruschetta.

ciabatta

This dough is a little bit fussy to work with (as are many ciabatta doughs). It’s very sticky and very wet, making it nearly impossible to mix and knead by hand. I used the dough cycle of my bread machine, but you could easily mix and knead it in a stand mixer fit with a dough hook, too.  The recipe also requires a biga starter—which sounds fancy, but is really just mixing some water, flour and yeast together and letting it ferment for a day to add a bunch of great flavor and help add the airy, open texture that ciabatta is famous for. Between making the starter, the two rises and baking time, it takes over a day to make this bread (mostly inactive). But since this recipe makes two decent-sized loaves that freeze well, and they are incredibly delicious, I promise it’s worth your time.

And if you come back later in the week, I have a way for you to use up that second loaf (if you can keep from eating it between now and then). Enjoy!

Whole Wheat Ciabatta

Adapted from: King Arthur Flour | Prep Time: 24 hours | Cook Time: 15 minutes | Makes: 16 servings

Ingredients

    For the Biga Starter
    • 1 cup whole wheat flour
    • 1/2 cup water
    • Pinch of yeast
    For the Dough
    • The starter
    • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    • 1 cup whole wheat flour
    • 1-1/2 teaspoons yeast
    • 1 tablespoon sugar
    • 1-1/2 teaspoons salt
    • 1/2 cup milk
    • 3/4 cup lukewarm water
    • 2 tablespoons olive oil

    Instructions

    1. In a small bowl, whisk together all the starter ingredients until well-incorporated. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and stash in a dark, cool place (not the fridge) for 24 hours.
    2. To prepare the bread, combine all the remaining ingredients plus the starter into the pan of a bread machine set to the dough cycle or the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook. If using the stand mixer, mix on low until well-combined, then knead on low for 10 minutes, or until the dough is smooth (but it will still be sticky). Let rise until double in volume, about 90 minutes.
    3. Deflate dough, dump out onto a lightly floured surface, and using floured hands, divide into two pieces. Form each piece into a 10-12″ log and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet, 5-6″ apart. Cover with a damp kitchen towel and let rise an additional 90 minutes, or until the loaves are large and puffy. Toward the end of the rise time, preheat the oven to 425°.
    4. After rise time, spritz the tops of the loaves with water (to help add a crunchy crust) and bake in preheated oven for 15-20 minutes, or until the crust is brown and the bottom sounds hollow when tapped. Let cool then cut each loaf into 8 slices.

    Nutrition Info

    Serving size: 1 slice | Servings per recipe: 16

     

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    Are you a confident yeast-wielder? What’s the best bread you’ve ever baked?

    13 Comments

    1. I love me some yeast bread! I blame my momma for getting me good at it… I’ve been baking bread and such for years! I make an amazing rustic Italian bread that is SUPER similar to this, just totally whitey-white. I’m making this ASAP! I love whole grains and see no reason not to be using them in traditional bread. And tell Craig we are really looking forward to that recipe :) Much love! M.

    2. Begging Craig for the sandwich bread recipe! So excited to try this one. I love ciabatta but really try to focus on whole grains. My best yeast dough is my pizza dough but it is definitely not whole grain. Love your blog, Cassie!

    3. Yummmm that looks delicious. Thanks for sharing the recipe!

    4. I’ve never made homemade bread that involves yeast! This looks delicious though. My family loves a good sturdy bread for dippin’, sandwich makin’, or just eating with a good schmear of [nut] butter!

    5. I make all of my own bread, too! I found an amazing recipe for super fluffy buns which I just doctored slightly to include wheat flour. It took a few experiments to find the right balance to keep it fluffy. :) I do kind of cheat, though, in that I make 95% of my breads by using the dough setting on my bread machine. It turns out perfect every time, though, so I don’t feel guilty! :)

      • I love, love, love the dough setting on the bread machine! There is something nice about doing it by hand every now and again, but when you’re just trying to get some bread done for dinner and you have a million other things to do? The bread machine is where it’s at.

    6. This looks great! I love ciabatta (who doesn’t??), and I’d totally love to try your whole wheat version.

    7. Thank you for sharing this recipe! I like to use “white whole wheat”. Have you used it? The recipe I bake most often is the “wonder bread” from The Bread Bible by Rose Levy Birenbaum, often using half white flour and half whole wheat. It’s also very delicious all whole wheat! Easy,tasty bread–good, as is, or for sandwiches. I mix it in the evening, put it in the refrigerator overnight, then proceed the next day. It can stay in the fridge until you have the time, very adaptable. Please post more of your baking recipes and please ask Craig to share his recipes, as well.

      • I have used white whole wheat, and it’s really nice (although unfortunately, also pretty expensive around here). I’ve never tried the overnight rise in the fridge, but it sounds so simple!

    8. That looks great! Here we call a biga ‘a sponge’, I think biga sounds nicer! Quite happy to play with yeast, have been experimenting with sourdough over the last couple of months and I feel like a magician! Making bread from nothing but flour, water and time! It’s very similar to this recipe and you do have to care for your starter, but it’s fun…

    9. My friend makes whole grain ciabatta all the time and it’s so good! This looks lovely. I’d smear goat cheese and veggies on top, if it were mine :)

    10. Cassie, the overnight in the fridge is recommended by Rose Levy Berambaum not only because of the convenience of continuing with the bread making when your schedule permits the next day, but especially because the long rise in the fridge adds fantastic flavor.

    11. do you ever save starter and go the sourdough route? I’m a huge fan of sourdough, but unfortunately have several whole-wheat-sourdough-fails under my belt. Just curious if you’ve tried/have any luck with that!

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